HOW IT WORKS and DESIGN

The Windworker extracts air from a building by applying the Bernoulli Principle - as wind passes over the curved section on the inside of the Windworker, it accelerates, like the wind over the wing of an aeroplane. The Windworker applies this concept to achieve a Venturi (vacuum) effect under the curved section which pulls hot air, pollutants and air pressure from a building. The aerodynamics of its design continually adjust its orientation to face into the direction of the oncoming wind.

This animation demonstrates air transfer from the interior of a building through the rooms to ceiling cavity to exhaust through the Windworker.

Windworker Exhaust System View of Windworker Half view of Windworker

A compression in the mid-section of the baffle and the expanding tail combine to provide an effective expulsion system by accelerating air flow. The serrated ends or "take-off points" break up the air flow and permit immediate dispersal of the heat, built-up air pressure and pollutants. The Windworker will function continuously, even in "no wind" situations, due to its unique patented design - using previously generated air flow, convection, heated air currents and accelerated air movements along the ridge of a roof, maintaining a constant airflow from the structure.

House, air flow and internal vent

Windworkers were tested by the Construction Research Laboratory in Florida, U.S.A. in 1981 to withstand cyclonic wind forces, and further by the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering at the James Cook University of North Queensland in 1985.

Video showing orientation to wind

Video showing suction test


Click Image to start video controls


Click Image to start video controls


The design of the Windworker combines aeronautics and the venturi principle to perform its requirements.

Although wide in appearance the frontal or leading section will not impair or restrict on flowing air.

The sides and bottom of the Windworker are shaped into curves which will create a turbulent forward air current along the external lines after an external air current or wind force exceeds 5 metres per second thereby assisting in maintaining the product's integrity in strong winds. A bird fly's forward through much the same design.


Curved Wings Shaping the Air Flow of a Bird Wing

Curved Wings Shaping the Air Flow of a Bird Wing

The arching or the curving outwards of the sides causes a reduced velocity along the outside of the unit while creating increased velocity internally from the pivot point towards the tail. This increases the expulsion system.
The "take-off points" or feathered ends are similar to the feathers of a bird's wing in that they are designed to break up the stale air flow and then to allow more air to take its place and continue the flow.


Feathered Ends of a Bird Wing

Feathered Ends of a Bird Wing

It has been expressed that aesthetically, designs do not usually incorporate both curves and points however those that do are easily recognised and distinguishable.

Sydney Opera House

Sydney Opera House


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